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go into effect. those come in gradually and they could come in more gradually if the government officials thought there was going to be a deal and they better hold off. the real uncertainty i think is what the markets will do. we look like a country that isn't in control of its own destiny, because we're acting that way right now. if you're an investor, whether you're in some part of the united states or you're in some other part of the world, do you really want to buy american securities? do you want to invest in a country whose government isn't functioning? i don't think so. we could get a big market reaction, drop in the stock market. that might scare people. >> how quickly do you -- >> but it would also be a bad thing. in itself, it would contribute to the possibility of having another recession. >> how quickly do you think we'll feel tremors from the debt ceiling now that the treasury is beginning to talk about avoiding it. >> i think we're seeing uncertainty about absolutely everything. it's cumulative, it's the debt ceiling, it's the fiscal cliff, it's what taxes are goin
. let me start with this. i have a message for the tea party members everywhere, destroying government is not good politics. you are engaged in negative politics. you are acting against the majority rule right now. you are trying to bring down the majority government by obstruction. people will remember. whot won tax relief. people who believe in government will remember. the people who believe in national defense and social security and medicare will remember. they will know which party is trying to destroy working democracy in order to pursue its political ends. they will know who listens to the voter, who respects the voter, and who thumbs his nose at the voter and that ladies and gentlemen of the tea party right is you. we go over this cliff and you will not have to ask for whom the bell tolls, it willing tolling for you. leading off tonight josh green and chris frats of national journal. you don't have to be as clear as i, but try, gentlemen, tonight. it looks to me like one party, guns again it's asymmetric. both parties are not screwing around, one is. is that true? >> i think b
. and then came this moment. november 9th, big debate, here he is trying to remember the three government agencies he wants to get rid of. let's watch. >> and i will tell you, it's three agencies of government when i get there that are gone. commerce, education and the -- what's the third one there? let's see. >> five. >> oh, five. okay, commerce, education and the, um, um -- >> epa? >> epa. there you go. >> seriously, is epa the one you're talking about? >> no, sir, no, sir. we're talking about the, um, agencies of government. epa needs to be rebuilt. >> but you can't name the third one? >> the third agency of government, i would do away with education, the commerce, and let's see. i can't. the third one, i can't. sorry. oops. >> he must have had a whole lot of help. >> you can't bring notes with you, they start scribbling the notes. >> up next, the right wing's most outrageous conspiracy theories are m coing up. this is "hardball," the place for politics. [ male announcer ] what are happy kids made of? bikes and balloons, wholesome noodles on spoons. a kite, a breeze, a dunk of grilled cheese. c
who captured. what they campaigned against was spending money on government, that is what taxes are. got it? and that's hardball for now, thanks for being with us "the ed show" with ed schultz starts right now. >>> good evening, americans, welcome to the ed show. i'm michael eric dyson in for ed schultz. the president cuts his vacation short to come back to washington, d.c., meanwhile, house republicans are literally phoning it in, this is the ed show, and as ed would say, let's get to work. >> this is something within our capacity to solve. it doesn't take that much work, we just have to do the right thing. >> six days away from the fiscal cliff and there are real consequences to millions of americans if no deal is cut. congressman elijah cummings and ryan grim of the huffington post are here with the latest. a tea party giant stages a coupe with his own office. the details on dick armey's hostile takeover. the nra is catching heat from all directions. >> i don't think the nra is listening, i don't think they understand. >> georgetown university law professor, david cole on the gro
of those outside the box ideas that the federal government should take seriously here? >> first of all, i don't know -- i would like to know, first of all how many schools there are in america. high schools, middle schools, preschools, private christian academies? the point is this is unfeasible. i'm not sure it's the right way to go to put an armed guard in every single school in america. who will pick up the taxpayer dla are on that? the counties, it is states? the locals the feds? who will do this? it's impractical. to the some mention i don't like guns in our schools. it's a nice political sound bite and they can use an old statement from bill clinton to say this, but i'm not sure it's a practical idea, frankly. >> first of all, when it comes to education, decisions really do need to be handled on a local level. that's how education decisions should be made. but at the same time i do support the idea of consideration putting an armed patrol officer. my sister in atlanta works at a receiving desk, and she's not prepared or trained for dealing with someone coming into the school. i woul
can move forward? >> well, first of all, we have to be able to govern. we have to have an adult conversation, getting people in the room who actually want to solve this problem. and i think it's very important to step back and see the fact that we have already -- there are three parts of this deficit reduction stool. we've already in the past two years passed $1.6 trillion in spending cuts. we've passed over $700 billion in savings in medicare through reforms like cutting back on overpayments to insurance companies. the one piece of this puzzle that we've not been able to get any support for is making sure that the wealthiest among us help solve this problem by being willing to pay a little bit more to be part of the solution. so we have sent a bill to the house back in july, bipartisan bill that says what -- everybody says they don't want middle-class families to have their taxes go up, well, fine. why don't we start with something we can agree on, which is that? and just pass that. why doesn't the house just pass that? but as we know, the speaker couldn't even pass his own pla
shrinking the government, making the government do less are actually good things. >> right, i don't think there's any question about that. we know there's an element of the republican party, ron paul, rand paul being the most visible, who think the less government does, the better. now, in that vain, i've been struck. david wasserman at the "cook political report" crunched the numbers on this, that there are 234 house republicans. 15 of them, 15 represent districts that president obama carried in 2012. given that, and we were talking with kelly about the fact that this has to come through the house at some point, that republicans still control. is there any reason for, politically speaking -- >> absolutely, right. >> -- not good of the country speaking, but politically speaking, is there any reason for these guys to make a deal given that for 215 of them, the constituency they represent are mitt romney's? >> i think this is the problem. where most people follow a presidential election and don't realize what happens in each of the districts. what republicans have done a very good job of in
a dramatic decline in their payments from the government, and certainly, that we're not going to do the sequester. we cannot tolerate, ordinary people can't tolerate these kinds of cuts in programs. >> absolutely. congresswoman jan schakowsky, thank you so very much. >> thank you. >> remember to answer tonight's question there at the bottom of the screen and share your thoughts on twitter @edshow and on facebook. i want to know what you think. >>> coming up, this congress is on track to be the worst congress ever. that's right. "the huffington post" amanda turco and robert reich will join me. my wife takes centrum silver. i've been on the fence about it. then i read an article about a study that looked at the long term health benefits of taking multivitamins. they used centrum silver for the study... so i guess my wife was right. [ male announcer ] centrum. always your most complete. of green giant vegetables it's easy to eat like a giant... ♪ and feel like a green giant. ♪ ho ho ho ♪ green giant >>> coming up, more on tonight's breaking news of the fiscal cliff with former la
't have a dramatic decline in their payments from the government, and certainly, that we're not going to do the sequester. we cannot tolerate, ordinary people can't tolerate these kinds of cuts in programs. >> absolutely. congresswoman jan schakowsky, thank you so very much. >> thank you. >> remember to answer tonight's question there at the bottom of the screen and share your thoughts on twitter @edshow and on facebook. i want to know what you think. >>> coming up, this congress is on track to be the worst congress ever. that's right. "the huffington post" amanda turco and robert reich will join me. >>> coming up, more on tonight's breaking news of the fiscal cliff with former labor secretary, robert reich, and amanda turco of "the huffington post." >>> then, chicago reaches the tragic milestone of 500 homicides in 2012. reverend jesse jackson will join me to discuss curbing gun violence in our cities. we'll be right back. >>> so the american people are watching what we do here. obviously, their patience is already thinning. this is deja vu all over again. america wonders why it is t
, to pay for more government spending that doesn't help us with the deficit. and you hear members of congress, your republican colleagues who say, in my district, they don't want more spending. and that's how they see this money being spent. >> two things i would say. first of all, that is not the democratic position. no one that i know of is arguing that all of the increased revenue should go for increased spending nap simply isn't the case. by the way not having the sequester doesn't mean increased spending. it mean not having spending cuts. i voted against the idea of a sequester. i think it's not right way to do it. what the republicans want to do is spend more on defense. let me deal with this notion that republicans for cutting spending. you heard mitt romney criticize president obama because he's not spending enough on ships, which we don't need, and not staying long enough in the war zones. the republicans' view of spending is very particular one. secondly, as far as the american people are concerned, people in their districts, gee, if they represent districts in new jerse
that has been taken up by our unfunded government programs. that is the number one cause of our fiscal and debt problem and it's not going away. so it looks like 2013 is going to be real. it's going to be dealing with issues of peace and war, national identity and issues of personal security. you think it's not important? say it and you're part of the problem. and that's "hardball" for now. th thanks for being with us. "politics nation" with al sharpton starts right now. >> thanks, chris. and thanks to you for tuning in. tonight's lead, the gop is in denial and they're scrambling to make a deal. the only problem? they still haven't learned that they're going to have to compromise. just hours ago, president obama returned home from christmas vacation. looking to jump start negotiations and protect millions from seeing their taxes go up. the news comes after a conference call that mr. boehner held with gop house members, telling them to return to washington this sunday. but just because they're coming back doesn't mean they're looking to play nice. today, senator harry reid blasted the s
into if you let the government default or whatever goes on this weekend, because basically defense spending will be cut and we'll have new payroll taxes and all tax rates will go up on income tax and estate taxes and all the bad stuff will happen, and how that's good politics. >> look, politicians are creatures of narrow self-interest. from the self-interested standpoint of a republican house member from a safe district who fears a primary challenge, yes, it's better for them to wait three days, cast -- go over the cliff, cast a vote to cut taxes and basically screw all the people who are going to be affected by it preserving their own jobs than it is to agree to a tax increase now and risk the wrath of the tea party right two years from now. >> chris, let me ask you about another possible, i hope it doesn't happen. next tuesday or next wednesday when the market reopens on january 2nd and they fully realize at that point that this cliff has been gone over and the congress has failed to meet its own targets which it set itself when it set this cliff up, who will pay the price if, say, the ma
and there will also be spending cuts to government programs as well as the military and that will be spread over with 2013 and the world doesn't come to an end if we go over this quote, unquote, fiscal cliff and instead, a lot of the damage gets spread out and congress does have the power to go back and fix things. >> is it more important that the payroll tax holiday will go away and that is another thing that will end up happening. >> the payroll tax holiday will be a temporary sting, and it was crafted in 2010 and that is right in the waning days of the 111th congress when they still held in control the house of representatives and all of the counter proposals and counter proposals, and house speaker john boehner and the offers we have on the table don't deal with the payroll tax holiday and they go up to people on the amount of money they put in the social security trust fund and that is your payroll tax and those will go up and pretty much regardless if we get a deal or we don't. >> mark murray from d.c., breaking it down for us and the senior editor, thank you, sir. >> as lawmakers in d.c.
coming in to the federal government and regresive in many ways and what it does is funds social security. so should we have even been tinkering with that in the first place? >> one tax cut that, you know, the democrats lobbying for and the republicans did not want because it's technically a stimulative effort. don't forget when it was enacted we were in the middle of a crisis. i think, you know, all sides would probably agree it helped and worked but it's probably time to go away so that's sort of, you know, it is the most immediate thing and i think that was inevitable anyway. the far greater concern is the bush tax cuts and what happens to them. >> you talk about the middle class shouldn't feel the pain here and everybody agrees with that but the working class, absolutely shouldn't have to pay for this and feel the pain but taking, getting rid of unemployment ben filths, talk about the price of milk going up and other things like that, that will have a huge impact on the working class, people that don't have savings dealing with losing $3,400 and can't deal with that at all and that's
think about politics, how we think about government, how we think about each other. >> there is a cultural shift, and jon meacham, i thought it was very telling what newt gingrich said about the republican party's challenges. he said they either wake up to the realities that are facing them. this election was much worse for them than they expected, or there will be young voters who will be obama democrats for the next 40 years. this could be a watershed election if the republicans don't respond in the correct way. >> one of the interesting things -- and i wonder if rick in thinking all this out, if what you all made of this -- is, you know, fdr had this legacy. you still had people -- hubert humphrey was still running in 1 1968 as an fdr democrat. one question i have is, is this wave of democrats, and is obama himself a sui generous figure or is he a kiclintonian figure? >> i addressed some of this. the "r" word, realignment, is something that people are talking about. there was a reagan realignment, and basically you could argue that this is finally the end of the
questions. the pentagon and all the other government agencies told their employees that they're not going to do anything with the sequester in january, because they're assuming congress will get its act together in january, february or so. so the idea that the markets are going to panic over this, you know, i think is a red herring. who knows? maybe they tank tomorrow. maybe they go through the roof. but i don't see that happening. though if it did that would drive things a little bit. >> do you have any sense they're feeling pressure from constituents at all? i would describe this as people are profoundly unhappy. >> that's a great point. congress' approval ratings are abysmal. but the pressure from the right for conservatives to cut a good deal, all this discussion about chained cpi is confusion. basically it means that republicans want to include entitlement reform as part of a deal. but why did they take that off the table? because when the debt ceiling comes next year, they can have a bigger fight about entitlement reform. so the big story today is that republicans are starting to re
the debt ceiling but also come march, you will have to figure out how to extend government spending for the rest of the fiscal year. and they don't, the government would shut down. there are major fiscal fights that need to be resolved beyond the immediate fiscal cliff. we are not even talking about the major policies that you are talking about. immigration reform and gun control legislation, those are things that can fall by the wayside if we are consumed by the fiscal talks which seems likely. >> it seems they crawl from one crisis to the next. thank you, sir, we will see you later in the hour. >> thank you. >> president obama will be talking about the fiscal cliff with david gregory on "meet the press" tomorrow, it's an exclusive interview, check your local listings for the air times. if you miss it, we will rerun it on msnbc tomorrow afternoon at 3:00. >>> want to update you on developing news in houston. george h. w. bush has been released from icugabe is staineding by. you told us two hours ago that the president was singing to doctors and unurses, he sounds like he is doing b
that the government has the responsibility to care for them. who believe they are entitled to health care, to food, to housing, to you name it. and so my job is not to worry about these people. i'll never convince them that they should take personal responsibility. >> a very valuable comment. >> i am going to go with bill clinton. >> one speech? >> it was 20 years in the making, the story of the speech, for the first 15 years, republicans treated bill clinton that he was the worst thing that ever happened to american politics. the villain in chief, and after he left the white house, there was the moment in 2008, when republicans decided wait a minute, no, bill clinton is this by-gone symbol of an era, in moderation, they sang his praises for four years, set him up as the good democrat, against obama's bad democrat, and what happens, the good democrat vouches for the bad democrat and disarmed what a lot of republicans were saying about barack obama. >> you have made a reasonable argument. >> i think the enviable one was rick perry, who made the step of going full anti-out immigrant zealotry. >> it
. if it cannot abe future that is 100% in accordance with its core beliefs and principles that's not governing. that's lobbing hand grenades. if you are only stabbeding on principle to appear taller, then you appear smaller, and the gop is shrinking daily before our eyes. if leadership casting vision, calling all your people to rise up, and we just watched what happened with lan b and speaker boehner trying to call his people to rise up, and you say his leadership really not in question unless paul ryan really wants it. do you think that people having these types of perspectives, like a mark mckinnan, that doesn't really ring true coming into the new year for speaker boehner. >> look, the problem for republicans and for moderate republicans like mark mckinnan is most of the people in the house are not of the mark mckinnan stripe. these are people who are from districts where they've won with 60% of the vote or more. the majority of them. the majority of their constituents don't want them to compromise on things that they find important like taxes. why someone like mitt romney winds up getting
naming of post offices, you know, government buildings. so that is really a level of productivity we haven't seen in the modern era. and you know, the thing is this is just a key thing to divided government but usually people are able to compromise and get something done but there isn't that commitment this time around. you have people stuck in their ideological positions and don't see a lot passed and signed in to law. >> what about the approval rating for this congress? >> it is at an all-time low in the nbc/"wall street journal" poll. an all-time low. that is just, you know, all-time lows. and, you know, i think that is a big reason you don't see people having a lot of confidence a lot will get as far as compromise goes as we're headed in to this fiscal cliff. >> you can probably ask people this next thing off the street, to give examples of the dysfunction of this congress because so many of these have been high profile. >> well, sure. there's so many different things of the debate, the standoff and both sides took some hits for. the super-committee failure setting this in motion
cannot go back and give money to people that can't survive the adjustment by government. this is very serious for working people and lower middle class people. >> you're absolutely right. this is a very serious matter. we need to work earnestly. the house members should be in washington. no reason to wait until sunday night. but i do want to say wup thing, al, and i think this is very important. one of the things that the house leadership is counting on is that we are so attuned to how serious this is that they're going to try to ram anything down our throat. now, let me tell you, we need a deal. we need a good deal. we need a fair deal. but we can't take any deal because this is a serious matter. we need to make sure that they don't make the poorest, vulnerable people pay for this thing. when they're talking about c cutting social security, i'm not guilty with that program. 2 million people's unemployment and a lot of other things -- sandy, help for sandy victims is all on the line here. we've got to get something done. >> i keep hearing this sad sacrifice like we had shared prosperi
government agencies are planning no immediate changes because they're anticipating some kind of deal. that leaves the unemployed, extended unemployment insurance will expire immediately if we go over the cliff. a deal later in january could theoretically restore extended benefits, the immediate damage will have already been done. for many people, this is all an interesting charade. but for the unemployed it's the real deal. get your cell phones out, i want to know what you think. tonight's question, who will the public blame if we go over the fiscal cliff? text a for democrats, text b for republicans to 622329. i'll bring you the results later in the show. >>> joining me now is congressman elijah cummings of maryland. welcome to the show. >> it's good to be with you. >> what do you make of the latest posturing. the house will they reconvene before january? they have a lot of stuff to do, so clearly they can't make it back to d.c. to do the people's business. >> as you said a few minutes ago, we have been assured we would be given at least 48 hours notice before we would have to come
serve to, "embarrass the administration, destroy the energy of government, and substitute the pleasure, caprice or artifices of an insignificant, turbulent, or corrupt junta to the regular deliberations and decisions of a respectable majority." good writer, that hamilton. but in recent years, the senate has been remade into a super majority constitution. disturb institution. you need 60 votes to get almost anything done. between 2009 and 2010, we had more filibusters than we had in the '50s, '60s, and '70s combined. and they're not filibusters like we think of them, where the senators go to the floor and debate an issue until they keel over from exhaustion. they're just obstruction. if you watch a filibuster today, it doesn't look like anything. it's the blue screen on c-span, the one with the classical music playing over it. you don't tune in to here an intense minority demand a great debate on the issue of the day. you tune in to hear a string quartet. senator jeff merkley, a democrat from oregon is trying to change that. he's got a proposal to force talking filibusters in the senate
the first penny yet from the federal government, and it's important people know that. what happened in that agreement is $1 trillion in increased expenditures didn't happen. >> okay. >> all right? and now that we're down to the hard work of actually trimming some of the waste out of the federal government, nobody wants to do that. and so, we're in trouble because we have a set of elite career politicians that re-elect themselves on the basis of the bounty that comes from the federal modus in washington, and rather than on the best interests of the country. and so, i would tell you that -- i would tell you that one of the reasons that we're having difficulty is the fact that we won't actually talk about the issues that are most important to solving our problems. the other point i would make is that we did not have a downgrade because of the debate over the debt limit. we had a downgrade because of our financial condition and the lack of political will to make hard choices to solve them. >> senator, okay. he's getting his ear piece back in. i will wait. i will wait. you got me again?
geithner warned the government would hit its legal borrow i borrowing limit i limit by monday. geithner says the treasury will be forced to take, quote, extraordinary measures to keep paying the bills. he also referenced the impending fiscal cliff, which threatens to derail the economy if a compromise can't be reached by next week on those big unanswered issues. with both sides locked in the standoff, house republicans are calling on senate democrats to act first. democrats aren't budging much on their demands. they want to extend tax cuts and incomes below $250,000, prolong unemployment benefits, and delay those sweeping spending cuts. sam stein. >> yes. >> what happens in -- and it appears it will happen -- we go off the fiscal cliff for a few days? >> not much, is my understanding. kwb, over time, it will have much more of an impact, and it's unknown exactly what the market's psyche will do with respect to the government's inability to come together. with respect to the tax hikes, it won't be as bad as the rhetoric is suggesting early on. whether it's enough to actually get people to
for them to be a governing party in any way, particularly in the house of representatives. they are an oppositional party there. but it makes it impossible for john boehner to govern in any effective way to make any sort of negotiation with the president to avoid a fiscal cliff. and the larger issue is that the national populous as a whole wants to see congress get stuff done. they want the accomplishments. so it works for republicans in some statewide races, mostly not but it's not a national agenda. >> allow me to reintroduce myself as a tea party spokesperson. what they say is they are a governing party. you said they're not. they say they are a governing party and they right now are causing the government to completely rewire the way that it deals with the deficit. and they say that there is pain in that process. but the long-term debate and the reason why they don't need to be inside the meeting room is they've got so many of the people in that room afraid of them that we are having a debate between how much to cut the deficit and not to do jobs or stimulus and the th
on all americans and a series of mandatory government spending cuts will kick in. hello, new year. hello, new recession. after two years of missing self-imposed deadline after self-imposed deadline, all eyes were on the senate over the weekend as the house's failure to even bring a plan to a vote left it up to the upper chamber to find a way out. vice president biden who had remained on the sidelines in this round of talks was even called in to help move things along. but as the saying goes, insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results. this morning, insanity continues as the clock ticks down and we have less than 17 hours to go. so joining us now to help us sort out this mess, we have former adviser to the bush administration and the romney campaign, dan senor. dan, will we go over the fiscal cliff? >> i'm afraid we will. i think it will get fixed right after right into the new year but i don't think it will get solved. >> something small, kicking the can down the road? >> correct. >> that same old thing. >> deal with the impasse until we get to t
. he is now telling congress that the u.s. government will reach its borrowing limit by next monday, the 31st. remember how much fun the last debt ceiling fight was? well, that news comes as president obama rushes home to washington, cutting short his hawaiian vacation in order to resume talks on the fiscal cliff. there are just five days remaining to strike a deal. we'll get to all that in a moment, but first, we begin with a massive winter storm that made holiday travel miserable for millions of americans, including me! winter storm euclid -- what, are we naming snowstorms now? euclid. you can lid? well, euclid blanketed much of the eastern half of the country yesterday, dropping blizzard-like conditions and record snowfall in the midwest, and by late afternoon, euclid moved northeast, bringing traffic to a standstill, forcing the cancellation of more than 1,500 flights on one of the busiest travel days of the year. the weather channel's mike seidel has more on the massive christmas storm. >> reporter: a major snowstorm has dumped over a foot of snow across parts of the midwest. i
and the government runs out of money. >> that's where i feel all the eyes are on capitol hill. saying you can't do this with the fiscal cliff. what a two months that will be. thanks so much for joining us. we appreciate it. joining me here in the studio with our first reads of the day, senior political editor mark murray. welcome. back and forth from the harry reid. we have congressional ping pong going on. you said it is time for house republicans to put middle class families first bypassing the senate's bill to protect 98% of americans on january 1st. the senate bill could pass tomorrow if the house republicans would lead it come to the floor. the house had two bills that collectively can avert the entire fiscal cliff if enacted. those bills await action by the senate. >> the classic ping pong gridlock and no way out. >> it's important to know how far we have come in the last seven days. a week ago we were closer than we had seen before on a particular deal. john boehner made a big concession allowing tax cuts to rise on income over a million dollars. president obama countered with a big concess
in entertainment and gaming are possible in health care, education and all government services. >> if we can dig down into education a bit more because i think the disparity in our education system, the haves and have nots in terms of education is another major barrier in terms of keeping the american dream alive. our education system has basically worked the same from inception. the classroom that my daughter will be in looks like the one i was in. looks like the one my parents were in. it seems like that we may may be on the verge of a technological revolution. some example i will give you is these massive open online courses where high level institutions like harvard and mit are opening up courses to thousands of people around the world, typically free and typically no credit given. students are grading each other because there so many you could never hope to have a professor grade all the students's work. what sort of innovations do you see transforming the classroom in the way that education is delivered? >> the main thing about the internet-driven revolution and every sector of the economy
the sort of optimal sort of career labor exchange through the government. >> that's right. and to your point, you've used the word flexible. let's take a look at who this flexibility works for. it works well for the employers, for the companies. but the rise of contingent labor, the rise of long-term unemployment and collapse of the local labor market have created incredible problems for workers. that flexibility has not worked for workers. >> there are problems that workers are experiencing that probably due to globalization and other things, it's causing a bad scene for workers in general. but these developments aren't necessarily making it worse. they are just going along with the badness there. like, for example -- >> i don't know about that. there are 64,000 workers in georgia who are going into christmas just having been kicked out of earned unemployment benefits. why? because they are working in schools. they are the people who clean the schools, drive the buses, serve food to the kids, and they have been told overnight that they should think of themselves as getting laid off on
to significantly reduce government spending by this time, midnight tonight, then there would be this draconian and indiscriminate cut across the board, 50% of it, $500 billion over ten years in defense, $500 billion over ten years in other social spending, including social safety net programs. everyone was going to feel a little pain. the trouble is now some elements, particularly in the senate, are trying to delay that, put that off, one month, two months, three months, even a year by some estimations, and a lot of folks, particularly republicans in the house, say no way, we're not going for that. we're getting nothing out of this in terms of spending cuts except the sequestration. a lot of ironies here. it was house republicans who literally blamed the president for coming up with the sequestration idea to begin with. they've spent months blaming him. what you saw mitch mcconnell do on the senate floor, fascinating, chris, on the surface. he came out after the president gave that upbeat, cheery, he was joking with all the attendees there in the white house complex about being close to a deal
democrats putting up votes to help make sure that we continue to fund the government, that we actually pay our bills as a government, that we find a balanced approach going forward. john boehner knows the votes from some of the republicans and some of the democrats can happen. and he's been unwilling to do that. >> do you think it's good -- >> it's hurting this country. >> is it good at this point in the process for harry reid to go on the senator floor and bash speaker boehner? does that not send a message this close to the deadline? >> he's trying to make it clear and i'm trying to make it clear that john boehner can't just say i'm not in there. of course, he is a player in this. if he does not work with the senate, work with the president and, again, the president has time and time again said we have some common ground here. if the republicans do agree, and they say they do, that they do not want to see tax rates go up on the american people, well, the president said let's make sure that we vote on that. 98% of americans can be protected from a tax increase. we can protect seniors under
the nation's problems, to do what we sent you to washington to do, which is to govern, and here we are with a countdown clock at the bottom, ten hours, 51 minutes, and 34 seconds to get something done that should have gotten done, could have gotten done months ago. a lot of people are scratching their heads wishing, hoping that, you know, at some point congress will get et cetera act together. we do have a new congress coming back in. we keep talking about the so-called fiscal cliff. there are consequences for inaction if that countdown clock gets to zero and there's no deal and no deal has been reached. >> jonathan, thank you. to your point, it's remarkable to me that what we're debating is exactly what we were debating six months ago. it's not as though something has happened recently. this is the debate we've been having or the debate we haven't been having making it all the more remarkable that we have a countdown clock for it. thank you. >> that's right. >> a deal on the fiscal cliff may be at hand, but there's still a lot to do, and not a lot of time to do it. delaware democr
enemies than ever and needs america's backing. but at the same time this israeli government is so spoiled and has shift sod far to the right it makes no effort to take u.s. interest into account. and i agree with that. when netanyahu moved and cut off any chance of a united west bank government, he basically took a step that was completely in the face of u.s. policy going back to george w. bush. >> that's true. i think one of the things to be keep in mind is this pre-nomination process seems to have gotten completely out of control. where congress has too much to say who the presumptive nominees that any president offers forth. over history only 20 cabinet nominees have been knocked back. seven have been rejected and 13 have withdrawn those names. seven of those have happened under the past three administrations. so i think there's something wrong with this whole process where a presumptive nominee is litigated in public and the -- >> how do you avoid this? how do you do it? >> he's got to make a decision. obama has either got to nominate him when he gets back to washington tomorrow or mo
secure embassies in areas where you essentially don't have governments that have a lot of capacity to protect those embassies. so we're doing a thorough review. not only will we implement all the recommendations made, but we'll try to do more than that. with respect to who carried it out, that's an ongoing investigation. the fbi has sent individuals to libya repeatedly. we have some very good leads, but this is not something that, you know, i'm going to be at liberty to talk about right now. >> in politics and the back-and-forth in this, do you feel like you let your friend susan rice hang out there to dry a little bit in. >> no. first of all, i think i was very clear throughout that susan has been an outstanding u.n. ambassador for the united states. she appeared on a number of television shows reporting what she and we understood to be the best information at the time. this was a politically motivated attack on her. i mean, of all the people on my national security team, she probably had the least to do with anything that happened in benghazi. why she was targeted individually fo
embassies in areas where you essentially don't have governments that have a lot of capacity to protect those embassies. so we're doing a thorough review. not only will we implement all the recommendations that were made, but we'll try to do more than that. you know, with respect to who carried it out, that's an ongoing investigation. the fbi has sent individuals to libya repeatedly. we have some very good leads. but this is not something that i'm going to be at liberty to talk about right now. >> in the politics and the back and forth in this, do you feel like you let your friend susan rice hang out there to dry a little bit? >> no. first of all, i think i was very clear throughout that susan has been an outstanding u.n. ambassador for the united states. she appeared on a number of television shows reporting what she and we understood to be the best information at the time. this was a politically motivated attack on her. i mean, of all the people in my national security team, she probably had the least to do with anything that happened in benghazi. why she was targeted individually for the k
in the country under the thumb of the federal government. congress debated this at length. they said if you're a -- a hobbyist or collector, a hunter in virginia wants to sell the gun to another hunter, they ought to be able to do it without being under the thumb of the federal government. >> if you want to check and screen more thoroughly for the mentally ill, why not screen more thoroughly for everybody and eliminate the fact that 40% can buy a weapon without a background check? >> we don't prosecute anybody under the gun laws right now. >> that's not responsive to the question. i hear you saying you can't do anything about high capacity ammunition magazines because it simply won't work yet you're proposing things that might not work. you're standard is anything that has a chance of working we ought to try except when it has to do with guns or ammunition. don't you see that people see that as a complete dodge? >> nra supports what works. we have accidents down to 1/10 what they used to be. we have supported prison building, supported projects where every time you catch a criminal with a g
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